The Best Reinvention? Do What You Already Know

I was in the media business for a long time – digital and broadcast, film, radio, TV, commercials, music videos, all of it.

One day in September, 11 years ago, it ended.

The one thing I failed to realize (until a friend mentioned it to me) was that I could port these experiences into a new career right away; I had the media DNA needed to do it. My friend said, “You should teach.”

“What? I couldn’t be a teacher!”

“You love staff meetings, admit it. The reason you do is you get to be the teacher in a classroom.”

He was right. My friend died a few years ago, and I miss him. I’m so happy I got the chance to tell him how much I appreciated what he saw in me, something I had no idea of at the time.

I extended a job skill set into higher education, teaching media behavior and platforms as an adjunct. That evolved into a full-time faculty job. Then I tacked on a career services role. At the end I was one of the top 15% of instructors in the university, measured by student evaluations. What a decade.

You can do this, too.

You are a bookkeeper? How about being an accountant?

You are a teacher? How about shooting for principal?

From Product Strategist to Marketing Manager? Sure, why not? I did that as well.

The natural extension of your current skills into something related, but better; what a great way to transition.

Think of all of your accomplishments. You have some. Make a list of them, and add to each achievement details of why you were able to do it. You’ll see patterns emerge that you didn’t think of before. Then it gets exciting.  Now you found some new jobs to network and apply for.

You already have all of the ingredients to reinvent. Ask someone to tell you about yourself. What you might learn could change your life.

Strange analogy, but true. It’s like a piece of lint on your chin. No matter how hard you look, you’ll never see it. But others can. Contact John for an evaluation here. We’ll find it 🙂

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